Exoskeleton

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Exoskeleton

Journal of Ecosystem and Ecography is an international open access journal which is celebrating 10th Anniversary , publishing the quality peer-reviewed research articles relevant to the field of Environmental Sciences.

As our journal has completed 10 years we are celebrating 10th anniversary we have announced almost 50 percent discount on article processing charge to commemorate its 10th Anniversary so we are inviting eminent researches,fellowmans, science students, scientists for the submission of their valuable,innovative articles which would be helpful to our journal publication in forth coming issue( volume10, issue 1) .

We would like to invite eminent researches to write a paper or short commentaries on the below discussed topics which would be helpful for the readers for their information

Submit manuscript at https://www.scholarscentral.org/submissions/ecosystem-ecography.html 

An exoskeleton (from Greek έξω, éxō "outer" and σκελετός, skeletós "skeleton") is the external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body, in contrast to the internal skeleton (endoskeleton) of, for example, a human. In usage, some of the larger kinds of exoskeletons are known as "shells". Examples of animals with exoskeletons include insects such as grasshoppers and cockroaches, and crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters, as well as the shells of certain sponges and the various groups of shelled molluscs, including those of snailsclamstusk shellschitons and nautilus. Some animals, such as the tortoise, have both an endoskeleton and an exoskeleton.

Role

Exoskeletons contain rigid and resistant components that fulfill a set of functional roles in many animals including protection, excretion, sensing, support, feeding and acting as a barrier against desiccation in terrestrial organisms. Exoskeletons have a role in defense from pests and predators, support and in providing an attachment framework for musculature.

Exoskeletons contain chitin; the addition of calcium carbonate makes them harder and stronger.[citation needed] Ingrowths of the arthropod exoskeleton known as apodemes serve as attachment sites for muscles. These structures are composed of chitin and are approximately six times stronger and twice the stiffness of vertebrate tendons. Similar to tendons, apodemes can stretch to store elastic energy for jumping, notably in locusts. Calcium carbonates constitute the shells of molluscs, brachiopods, and some tube-building polychaete worms. Silica forms the exoskeleton in the microscopic diatoms and radiolaria. One species of mollusc, the scaly-foot gastropod, even makes use of the iron sulfides greigite and pyrite.

Some organisms, such as some foraminiferaagglutinate exoskeletons by sticking grains of sand and shell to their exterior. Contrary to a common misconception, echinoderms do not possess an exoskeleton, as their test is always contained within a layer of living tissue.

Exoskeletons have evolved independently many times; 18 lineages evolved calcified exoskeletons alone. Further, other lineages have produced tough outer coatings analogous to an exoskeleton, such as some mammals. This coating is constructed from bone in the armadillo, and hair in the pangolin. The armor of reptiles like turtles and dinosaurs like Ankylosaurs is constructed of bone; crocodiles have bony scutes and horny scales.

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Accepted manuscripts submitted before the deadline will be published within the given timeframe for the respective journal publication.

Contact:

Grace

Journal Manager

Journal of Ecosystem and Ecography